TRAINING TUTORS TO PROMOTE SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING AMONG UNIVERSITY-BOUND ENGLISH LANGUAGE STUDENTS

Autores/as

  • Melissa Williamson Hawkins University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Josephine Prado University of Alabama at Birmingham (USA)
  • Julia Austin University of Alabama at Birmingham (USA)

Resumen

Instructors who teach in English as Second Language (ESL) programs must balance time allotted to teach
academic English with the numerous study skills needed by university-bound English learners. However, for these
language learners to close language-learning gaps independently and achieve higher levels of communicative
competence, they must assume increasingly greater degrees of autonomy in their own language learning process.
Although a high level of self-direction is needed, it is not a characteristic that is common to all students. Through
explicit instruction, teachers can scaffold language learners as they implement feasible, concrete actions towards
language-learning autonomy. In an ESL program at a southeastern U.S. university, the current qualitative study
explored the effects of explicit instruction on self-directed learning (SDL) strategies. Study participants were ESL
tutors. After being trained in SDL strategies, these tutors recommended SDL strategies to their tutees in individual
tutoring sessions. Findings revealed 4 main categories of SDL assignments recommended by these tutors to their
tutees across one semester. Implications from this study suggest that language programs should train teachers and
tutors in SDL principles, in the role of SDL in language development, and in strategies for promoting SDL among
language learners.

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Publicado

2020-11-17